Orange Conference Follow Along

OC Follow

This week I’ll be at The Orange Conference in Atlanta, GA seeing what is happening in and around the world of local church ministry to children, students, and families. I’ll be in breakouts, meeting with friends, and trying to update my social media feeds with those items that are curious, intriguing, and thoughtful.

Orange Leaders Blog

You’re accustomed to reading helpful leadership articles and event information from Orange Leaders blog. During conference, you’ll still receive detailed information about OC15, as well as information about Orange Tour and Orange Conference 2016, so check the blog daily. As well, we’re including recaps and notes on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday so that you’ll be able to take in some of the key concepts being presented this year. To easily see all of the posts related to OC15, click this category link.

Social Media Accounts to Follow

Whether you’re a preschool leader or a NextGen leader, Orange Leaders have accounts for you to follow on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and beyond. In addition to our brand accounts, our Orange Specialists each have Twitter accounts where you can connect, share, and learn helpful insights. Click to see all of the Orange social media channels.

Hashtag

A hashtag is a means by which you can follow a subject matter or conversation on social media channels such as Twitter, Facebook (public posts), Instagram, Google+ and more. A hashtag is our connection to you. It’s how ministry leaders and Orange hears your ideas, questions, and insights. Every time you use the hashtag for The Orange Conference —#OC15—there’s a group of leaders listening and learning from you. Join the conversation.

Be aware that no person or company can “own” a hashtag. Therefore anyone can use a hashtag for any material they choose to publish. Orange takes no responsibility for unseemingly content published using any of these promoted hashtags.

Twitter Searches to Follow

Whether you have a Twitter account or not, you can still follow the Twitter conversation by following searches.

To follow a search, simply go to www.Twitter.com, search for the name, subject or hashtag you wish to follow, and bookmark the search. Refreshing the bookmarked search page will allow you to stay on top of the most recent posts on your desired topic.

Tip: At the top of the search page, you can choose to view the “Top” posts for your search, or you can choose to see “All” posts for your search.

Recommended Searches For Those Attending OC15:

Twitter: #OC15
Twitter: #JustAPhase
Instagram: Using the search feature indicated by the magnifying glass in the app, you can search for names, hashtags and subjects to see recent posts.
Facebook: In the search function at the top of the newsfeed, enter any search term or hashtag to find related posts.

Recommended Searches for Those Not Attending OC15:

Twitter: #OC15Live – You’ll be watching the Live Stream at home, right? See below for details.
Twitter: #OC15
Twitter: #JustAPhase
Instagram: Using the search feature indicated by the magnifying glass in the app, you can search for names, hashtags and subjects to see recent posts.
Facebook: In the search function at the top of the newsfeed, enter any search term or hashtag to find related posts.

Twitter Lists to Follow

Each Twitter user has the ability to create lists of people from which they want to see posts. Orange Leaders has created a couple of lists you can follow that you may find useful.

If you have a Twitter account, you can “subscribe” to lists so that you have access to only that particular group of Twitter accounts via your “Lists” menu. To find the Orange Leaders’ lists, go to Twitter.com/OrangeLeaders, click “Lists.” Next, click the list name, and on the left, click to subscribe. Subscribing to lists gives you access to this group’s updates via your Lists menu in your account.

If you don’t have a Twitter account, bookmark the following URLs:

Speakers at Orange Conference 2015
Orange Bloggers at Orange Conference 2015:

How to access/view Twitter accounts without opening a Twitter account.

If you’re not interested in following lists, or bookmarking searches, you can still find information from your favorite authors or speakers on Twitter without having an account—provided the person you want to view has a public account.

To read a public Twitter account, go to Twitter.com and search for the person’s name or email address, if you have it. Or, if you have the person’s account handle, for example @OrangeLeaders, simply add /OrangeLeaders (removing the at-symbol, @, and replacing it with a forward slash, /) to the end of www.Twitter.com. To go to the Orange Leaders account page without having an account, in your browser’s URL address bar, type www.Twitter.com/orangeleaders.

Live Stream and OC15Live Hashtag

Once again, we are excited to offer non-attendees a Live Stream experience throughout OC15. Watch from the comfort of your home or office or favorite restaurant—provided that WiFi is available.

Be sure to RSVP today, and watch this blog for updates and the soon-to-be-released schedule!

IFTTT

For those who like to get a little more technical, the web and phone application, IFTTT (If This Then That), can provide hacks for gathering resources, information and contacts.

Click to view Orange Leaders’ IFTTT recipes.

 

 

“The growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”

George Eliot

A Sincere Response to No

BY: Starr Cliff

Ever seen a stubborn kid throw a fit about not getting his way?  Quite a scene, right?

I can’t quote him exactly, but a few Sundays ago our pastor said something along the lines of “Our response to ‘No’ is a measure of our maturity. How we feel and act when our expectations are not met reveals our self-righteousness.”

toldno

I love when a truth about my relationship with Father God parallels so well with the relationship I have with my own children. Seeing a spiritual truth play out in my parenting helps me better grasp the truth of it in my own personal responses to God.

One of the greatest joys I experience as a mom is when my kids obey joyfully. It communicates so much about trust, and right relationship,  and contentment.

When my child can handle “no” without throwing a fit,  it makes me more likely to trust him with a “yes” down the road. I know he can be trusted in more mature situations (sleep-overs,  parties,  technology) when being told “no” to those things doesn’t leave him undone. He is viewing things with the proper, healthy perspective when not being able to have whatever that “thing” may be doesn’t leave him flailing. If I tell a kid to turn off a video game and he does it happily, great! If I tell him to turn off a video game and he pouts and panics, or even just quietly ignores me,  he’s probably on the road to giving that game an unhealthy place in his life (or in stronger terms, making that game an idol).

Likewise,  what is my response when feeling like I need to put down something in my own life? Do I sometimes quietly ignore prompts from the Father to quit doing something? To start doing something? You bet I do. Because just like my children, I don’t like no.  I think I know best.  And ignoring prompts from the Father messes with the relationship.  It’s not a severed relationship; God doesn’t stop loving me just like I don’t stop loving my children. But in both cases it makes for a petulant, unhappy child.  In my experience as a mom, unhappy petulant children can’t do much other than just be unhappy and petulant.  They miss out.  There is joy to be had, but they miss it.

There’s also a trust issue at hand, right? If my child is mature and accepts my love and care for him,  he can more readily accept my “no”. He wants what he wants,  sure,  but our relationship doesn’t become undone when he hears my “no” because he trusts that I must have a reason. He can experience disappointment while simultaneously trusting that I’m doing what’s best for him.  (Well, at least what I think best within my my limited,  human frailty and understanding. When God says “No”, I can trust in His perfection.)

I have been told “no” by God, and it’s hard.  Painful stuff.  Trust, contentment, maturity — the absence or presence of all those things are on grand display and it’s not always pretty.  The “no” that I received wasn’t a command or a nudging in a certain direction, or a decision I got to make for myself; but instead it was out of my hands and in the form of friendships that didn’t play out how I wanted, jobs I didn’t get to keep, and places I didn’t get to live.  When I see those circumstances in my life as directed by the hand of a loving, caring, perfect Father, they are still painful but not nearly as much so.  I trust him.  His plan is better than mine.

The more I seek relationship with God, the more I believe that He is the author of the story of my life, and the more I experience of His faithfulness, the more I can accept that “no” is always for my good and His glory.

Look for a purpose in the pain that “no” can bring.  It’s there.  He doesn’t waste anything.

All praise to God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.  God is our merciful Father and the source of all comfort.  He comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort others.  When they are troubled, we will be able to give them the same comfort God has given us.  2 Corinthians 1:3-4

 

Kindness

Kindness

BY: Starr Cliff

Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. -Colossians 3:12

Some thoughts, of late, on kindness.

To “be nice” is a very different thing that showing great kindness. Excerpt from a post exploring this idea: “…kindness emerges from someone who’s confident, compassionate and comfortable with themselves…..At the root of extreme niceness, however, are feelings of inadequacy and the need to get approval and validation from others.”  So much worth for me in exploring the true intent of the energy I spend in my words and interactions with others.  More thoughts here.

People won’t always know what to do with your acts of kindness. They might mistrust your motives, or think you are being weird. That’s okay. Do kind acts anyway. Say kind words anyway.

An easy practice:  If you think something nice about someone, SAY IT. Both to them, and to others. If you think something unkind/unflattering/ugly about someone, don’t.  Don’t say it. To them or to others.

I so want to raise kind, caring children.  It starts by figuring out how to teach them to be kind to one another, and frankly, we can use some work there.  It’s always hardest to be kind to those under the same roof it seems.

I was cleaning out a file cabinet this week, and was reminded of a handwritten note I got from a hard-nosed history teacher when I was in 11th grade.  It was short but heartfelt, congratulating me on a performance in a high school play.  In retrospect, that little note really mattered to me. (Duh.  It’s been 20 years and I can still practically recite it.)  I had thought in high school that maybe I was “sorta becoming okay at this drama thing”, but that simple note made me feel like I was really good at something.  How easy would it have been for him to leave that note unwritten or those kind thoughts unshared?  WRITE THE NOTE PEOPLE.  You can’t know how it might matter to someone.

 

5 Reasons Easter at Your Church Still Matters

EasterLily

In just a few weeks many across our towns and cities will gather in churches to celebrate Easter. More appropriately, we’d say that some gather because their mothers asked them to attend; but for the most part many feel compelled to remember the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. This is a good thing.

I’ve served in the local church for over a decade now, and have seen the the great, and unfortunately the regrettable approaches to celebrating this holiday together. It’s easy as a church staff insider to get lost in the organization of a day with 3 times the normal responsibility, and it’s also easy to forget that what we are doing on this weekend of all weekends matters.

Here are 5 reasons to make it worth the effort this year:

1. People far from God feel safe to be in your church. I’ve seen opportunities on Easter where those that have felt far from knowing Christ have used the holiday to approach Him in the safety of the numbers that Easter presents.

2. People close to God need the reminder of what it means to celebrate the resurrection. Many could go on and on about how we don’t talk enough Jesus in our churches, but I won’t go there. Instead let’s remember that Easter of all Sundays, is the one weekend that we are without excuse to put Jesus front and center.

 

3. Easter is for families. Easter is a holiday, and holidays bring out the family in all of us. It’s a season that people gather with their families, share big meals, hunt easter eggs, wear pretty dresses, and show off their favorite pastels for all to see. While these things in and of themselves will not save us from our sins, they are still things that bring families together. How can you leverage that?

4. Authentic community can flourish at Easter. Just as the resurrection of Christ is celebrated, we can also celebrate those that help this special weekend happen! Easter is a great reminder that it takes a community, working through Christ, to reach a community.

5. Jesus.